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Local Forecast

Heat, Waves, & Then Some Wind

Air Quality Report (As of 7am)
Good to moderate for all reporting areas.

Weather Story: High pressure will continue to block storms to the north into next week. Its associated dome of warm, dry air will keep highs well above normal for this time of year through the weekend. It will begin to move west next week. First, allowing for cooler air masses to invade from the north. Gusty offshore flow is likely during this transition on Monday which may actually warm coastal areas even though the overall air mass is cooling. Much cooler weather expected by the end of the week and eventually, somewhere around the 23rd-25th, rain chances may return.


Friday: Mostly sunny with a few high clouds passing through. Very warm temperatures can be expected with most areas topping out in the 70s. A few coastal cities and higher elevation locations will only reach the upper 60s. Some cooling expected on the coast in the afternoon due to a slightly stronger sea breeze. Dry, northerly breezes over the hills at times.

From the National Weather Service in Monterey…
Large, long period northwest swell and strong rip currents will impact the coast from late Friday morning through early Saturday evening. Forerunner waves from 3 to 6 feet with swell periods of 20 to 22 seconds will arrive late Friday morning. Friday afternoon through Saturday morning expect swell heights of 15 to 17 feet with up to 19 feet breaking waves at favored breakpoints and swell periods of 18 to 20 seconds. Expect swell heights 15 to 17 feet with 16 second swell periods from early afternoon to early evening on Saturday. Additionally, hazardous long period swell, strong rip currents and sneaker waves will impact the northern Monterey Bay coastline from late Friday morning to early Saturday evening where a beach hazards statement is in effect.

Dangerous swimming and surfing conditions with strong rip currents and sneaker waves. People are strongly urged to remain well back from the ocean as these types of events often result in an increase in cold water rescues and the loss of life.

*Beach Hazards*
…for the immediate coast on the north side of Monterey Bay from Friday morning through Saturday evening.

Forerunner waves from 2 to 3 feet with swell periods of 20 to 22 seconds will arrive late Friday morning. From Friday afternoon through Saturday morning expect swell heights of 7 to 12 feet and swell periods of 18 to 20 seconds. Expect swell heights 7 to 12 feet with diminishing swell periods to 16 seconds from early afternoon to early evening on Saturday.

Remain out of the water to avoid hazardous swimming conditions.

**High Surf Advisory**
…for the immediate coast of Monterey County from 11AM Friday until 7PM Saturday

Forerunner waves from 3 to 6 feet with swell periods of 20 to 22 seconds will arrive late Friday morning. From Friday afternoon through Saturday morning expect swell heights of 15 to 17 feet with up to 19 feet breaking waves at favored breakpoints and swell periods of 18 to 20 seconds. Expect swell heights 15 to 17 feet with 16 second swell periods from early afternoon to early evening on Saturday.

Inexperienced swimmers should remain out of the water due to dangerous surf conditions.

Overnight: A bit of overcast, otherwise clear. Lows in the 40s for most areas with a few southern valleys dipping into the 30s.

Saturday: Mostly sunny, but a bit cooler with highs in the 60s-70s for most areas. Northerly winds over the hills at times and an active sea breeze on the coast.

**High Wind Watch** …in effect from Sunday evening through Monday afternoon for the Diablo Range in Santa Clara County.

Starting around Sunday evening at the highest peaks before mixing down to the rest of the hills and mountains late Sunday night and through Monday.

Sustained winds of 15-20mph with gusts of 25-35mph possible across much of the North Bay Mountains and East Bay Hills. Areas above 1000ft have the potential to see sustained winds of 40-45mph with gusts of 50-55mph possible at the highest peaks.

High winds have the potential to topple power lines and trees , along with creating hazardous driving conditions. Be sure to plan accordingly if you plan to travel in these areas and to secure light property.

A High Wind Watch means there is the potential for a hazardous high wind event. Sustained winds of 40-45 mph at some of the higher elevations with gusts of 50-55 mph or stronger possible at
some of the highest peaks. Continue to monitor the latest forecasts for any updates on wind speeds.
   



Extended:  Warm, dry conditions will continue under mostly sunny skies through the weekend into next week. Offshore winds will strengthen late Sunday through early Tuesday and could get gusty at times. Temperatures will initially warm back up through Monday, then cool down quite a bit by mid-week. Rain chances will likely hold off until at least the 23rd, but it may actually be a few more days after that before we see rain.
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This week's normal temperatures:

--COASTAL CITIES--
LOW: 42ºF
HIGH: 60ºF

--INLAND CITIES--
LOW: 36ºF
HIGH: 62ºF

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-The outlook from the Climate Prediction Center for January 22nd – 28th calls for the likelihood BELOW normal temperatures and ABOVE normal precipitation. 
-El Niño/La Niña STATUS: Moderate La Niña
-Forecast into Winter: La Niña Advisory

-Area drought status: 
Moderate drought most of our viewing area.  A small slice of southeastern Santa Clara and northeastern San Benito Counties are considered to be in Severe Drought.

California Weather / Weather / Weather Authority / Weather Team / Weather Video
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Zach McIntyre

Zach McIntyre is the morning meteorologist at KION News Channel 5/46.

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